Skip to content
June 25, 2014 / Jessica Connell

Nine Facts to Know if You Receive an IRS Letter

The IRS sends millions of letters and notices to taxpayers for a variety of reasons. Many of these letters and notices can be easily dealt with without having to call or visit an IRS office. Here are nine things you should know about if you receive a notice or letter from the IRS.

1. There are a number of reasons why the IRS might send you a notice. Notices may request payment, notify you of account changes, or request additional information. A notice normally covers a very specific issue about your account or tax return.

2. Each letter and notice offers specific instructions on what action you need to take.

3. If you receive a correction notice, you should review the correspondence and compare it with the information on your tax return.

4. If you agree with the correction to your account, then usually no reply is necessary unless a payment is due or the notice directs otherwise.

5. If you do not agree with the correction the IRS made, it is important to contact us before responding. We’ll help you to prepare a written explanation to send to the IRS of why you disagree and make sure it includes any information and documents the IRS should consider that support your case. You should hear from the IRS within 30 days regarding your correspondence.

6. Most correspondence can be handled without calling or visiting an IRS office. In order to handle any issues that arise more quickly, we ask that that you please have a copy of your tax return, as well as any correspondence from the IRS available when you speak to us.

7. It’s important to keep copies of any correspondence with your other tax records.

8. IRS notices and letters are sent by mail. The IRS does not correspond by email about taxpayer accounts or tax returns.

If you have received a letter or notice from the IRS and have questions or concerns don’t hesitate to call us.

 

For more tips visit www.PlumCPAs.com

Copyright © 2014 CPA Site Solutions

This information is  for general guidance only, and does not constitute the provision of legal advice, tax advice, accounting services, investment advice, or professional consulting of any kind. The information provided herein should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional tax, accounting, legal, or other competent advisers. Before making any decision or taking any action, you should consult a professional adviser who has been provided with all pertinent facts relevant to your particular situation. Tax articles are not intended to be used, and cannot be used by any taxpayer, for the purpose of avoiding accuracy-related penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. The information is provided “as is,” with no assurance or guarantee of completeness, accuracy, or timeliness of the information, and without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including but not limited to warranties of performance, merchantability, and fitness for a particular purpose.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: